The work surface should be heavy duty to withstand the abuse it will take. Look for a handle to raise and lower the saw blade easily. It should have another handle so that you can adjust the angle of the blade. See if there are connections for a dust collector, too, to make that aspect easier. You’ll want your table saw to have enough power to cut through hardwood and make deep cuts. Again, look at amps and horsepower. The motor should start with little to no vibration and run smoothly. Make sure it has a blade guard and that the on/off switch is easy to reach. These days, the power switch is a paddle that is easily pressed with your knee if you need an emergency off.
The best thing about the toy chest is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can also modify your kid’s toy chest in any way you want or build in a different design or color different from the one pictured above. You can try some other designs for your plan in the below-mentioned link.
Yes Seriously! You can build an easy bed frame yourself without any other’s help. As everyone knows the starting point of any bedroom is a gorgeous bed. However, you also need something that lets you enjoy peaceful slumber in comfort and warmth, but since the bed took as the focal point of the room, you may need something that looks really good too.
This is another example of small woodwork projects that require good time and woodworking skills. This item is built using multiple wooden parts. Each part is shaped in a specific design and then all parts are attached together to make the final TV set. I have never tried building this one, mostly because I don’t own an iPhone, but also because making this item is not an easy task. By the way, it works fine with all kinds of phones.
The bench is not difficult to build, but it requires a methodical construction process. If you follow the procedure carefully, you get a massive top that's flat, square, and needs hardly any cleanup after it's glued together. The top has four rows of bench-dog holes bored into it. Specialized hardware called bench dogs fit into these holes, and when combined with other accessories and our Yost woodworking vise, the benchtop can hold a workpiece of just about any shape or reasonable size.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Wipe on a coating of Watco Danish Oil Finish to the legs and cross supports, then bolt the base together. Now mount the top. The benchtop is flush to the outside surface of the base on the back. Center the top on the base left to right, bore 1⁄4-inch pilot holes through the cross supports and into the top. Drive the 3⁄8-inch lag screws into the top. Now that the bench is complete, build something great.

As pitch from the wood you cut accumulates on your saw blades, you’ll need to pause and take the time to clean them off. The pitch will heat up as you use the blade, and overheat the blade, damaging it. There are a number of commercial cleaners available, but you can just soak them in oven cleaner. This will dissolve the pitch, with only a little rubbing. Do not use any abrasives on your saw blades. Scrubbing cleansers and rough pads will leave scratches on the blade, which will only hold more pitch, making the problem worse the next time you need to clean the blade.

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This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
Not happy with the selection of sanding blocks at the hardware store, I made a few of my own from hardwood scraps left over from a woodworking project. I cut each one to 3/4 in. x 1-1/2 in. x 4-1/2 in.—which is just the right size to wrap a quarter sheet of sandpaper around. And the “kerf” cut helps hold the sandpaper in place until I’m ready to change it. —Tim Olaerts. Here are 41 more genius sanding tips you need to know.
The base on my old bench has a wedged dovetail joint that connects the long rails to the posts, and the rails would loosen every winter in the dry heat of my shop. A better system is a 5/16-in. steel rod with threaded ends that runs in a groove the entire length of each long rail and through the posts. The rods let me take up any looseness in the joints over time (which will certainly happen), and make it easy to knock down, if needed. For the parts I used 12/4 ash, a sweet-working, strong, stable wood.
A board is considered “quarter-sawn” when the growth rings run, more or less, perpendicular to the face of the board. Quarter-sawn boards generally have straight grain and are less prone to shrinkage, compared to other boards. These factors don’t come into play with the 2x4s you use to frame a closet—but it does with the shelves and cabinetry you put into that closet; you want those boards to remain straight, flat and stable.
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