Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.

When Brandon and I first started woodworking, we had to make large rip cuts with our circular saw for several projects where cutting across long pieces of wood or plywood was necessary. Of course they needed to be perfectly straight cuts! We didn’t have the room or budget for a table saw, so we actually created our own DIY straight-edge guide out of wood. However, I later discovered this Kreg Rip Cut which is a super handy and simple tool for ensuring accurate rip cuts (and it’s less than $30). We still use our DIY straight edge guide since it works great too, but had I known about the Kreg Rip Cut at the time, I would have bought it immediately and saved us the hassle of DIYing it which took a lot of time and effort.


I don't see anywhere you mentioned the over all length of the bench top. A piece of 1 1/2" x 25" x 8' glued edge oak at Lumber Liquidators costs $192 including tax. Two piece is almost $400! Would that be better if I use two IKEA 1 1/4" x 25" x 74" solid Beech ($99 each plus tax) on top of a layer of 3/4" Birch plywood. That would be 3 1/4" over all.
Next, lay the glued-together subassemblies on a flat surface. Measure and mark the centerlines of the holes for the bench dogs based on the diagram on the opposite page. Separate the pieces and continue the reference line for the bench-dog holes down the face of each piece. Install a 3⁄4-inch brad-point bit in the drill press and mark a reference line on its fence to match the center of the bit. Now take each glued-together three-piece and four-piece assembly, align each mark for a bench-dog hole with the one on the fence, and bore the holes in its edge.
Wipe on a coating of Watco Danish Oil Finish to the legs and cross supports, then bolt the base together. Now mount the top. The benchtop is flush to the outside surface of the base on the back. Center the top on the base left to right, bore 1⁄4-inch pilot holes through the cross supports and into the top. Drive the 3⁄8-inch lag screws into the top. Now that the bench is complete, build something great.
I built my first platform bed by following the steps mentioned in the tutorial and the end result was everything I expected. It was as beautiful as comfortable and strong. It only cost me around $60 to build this one from the scratch. And if I can build it, anyone can. What you need is a little bit of woodworking experience and a lot of confidence. Collect the items as suggested in the video and start working now.
Furnishing and decorating your patio is not an easy task – but then again, it has to be done! Your patio is obviously one of the most important rooms in your home, as you can easily turn it into your little piece of Heaven, your “safe spot” in your home where you can retreat whenever you want to ignore the world and just spend some time alone all by yourself.
Your drill press will have a platform for the stock you are drilling, but your table saw will have – well – a table. There are a few precautions you should take with each of the tables you use for your saws and drills. These tables are usually made of cast iron. Cast iron rusts easily. It will come with a special grease that protects the surface during storage. You’ll need to clean the grease off of the surface and apply a protectant in its place that won’t stain your stock or be a fire hazard. Possibly the best product for this is simple car wax. Carnauba wax protects your car from harsh elements and will do the same for your table. Just be very sure that you don’t use silicone wax because the residue interferes with the finish on certain woods.
The best thing about this wine rack is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can modify your wine rack any way you want or build in a design or color different from this one. The basic steps to build a wooden wine rack are the same for all variants. I have included here the video tutorial that I followed in order to build myself a pallet wide rack.
You may even want to put yourself in the picture. If your workshop space already exists, find a large piece of cardboard, wallboard, or plywood that’s about the size of the workbench top you envision. Find a couple of stools or chairs, perhaps a few books, and turn them into stanchions to support the “benchtop.” Is it too big for the space? Is it large enough for the tasks you envision will be performed upon it?
Once you start spreading glue, you have maybe five minutes to get the two panels mated, aligned, and clamped together. So make sure you have everything on-hand, and you're not gong to be interrupted. Start squeezing out the glue on one MDF panel, and spreading it around in a thin, even coating, making sure you leave no bare areas. Then do the same to the other MDF panel. Then pick up the bottom panel and flip it over onto the upper panel. Slide it around some to make sure the glue is spread evenly, then line up one corner and drive in a screw. Line up the opposite corner and drive in a screw there. Clamp all four corners to your flat surface, then start driving the rest of the screws, in a spiral pattern from the center.

Get a good bench grinder. It doesn’t have to be in the way – you can make a stand for it and keep it in the corner. But you’ll be amazed at how much you’ll use a bench grinder. You’ve got to keep all of your chisels sharp and keep the burrs off of your screwdrivers, too. A grinder doesn’t cost that much, and the time and expense it saves you when you have dull tools will pay for itself in no time.


With the shelf secure, get a couple of friends to come help, and stand the bench on its feet. I said earlier moving the top by yourself is dangerous. Trying to lift the entire bench is foolhardy. Of course, I already said I'm stubborn, so I did it myself by rigging a simple block-and-tackle using lightweight pulleys I got at the hardware store. (Not the lightest-weight pulleys, those are meant for flag poles and have a design load of something like 40 pounds. These had a design load of 420 pounds.)
Instead of using a container to mix a small amount of epoxy, just make a mixing surface on your workbench using painters tape. Simply lay down strips, overlapping the edges so the epoxy doesn’t get on your bench. When you’re done, peel off the tape and throw it away. This mixing surface will work for more than just epoxy, you can use it for wood glue or any other material you need easy access to while working on a project.
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